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2.1.2 Configurer Dialog

in-edit

The Configurer is our name for the tabbed dialog that appears when you click Config on the Entry Window top menu, and then choose Configure Ports, Mode Control, Audio, Other. The Configurer has many tabs with program settings influencing all aspects of the behavior of the program. Be careful in setting up items on the different tabs, to be sure that you understand that the option you are choosing is what you want.

Configurer settings are remembered by the program in the N1MM Logger.ini file, which is in the N1MM Logger+ user files area. Function key definitions, telnet clusters, call history, and country information are not saved in the .ini file, but in the database that was in use when you loaded them. That means, for example, that function key definitions loaded or modified when you are using one database will only appear in that database. You will need to export them from that database and load them into another database before they would show up there. The N1MM Logger.ini file contains the name of the database file you were last using, which the program will load when it is started, as well as the name of the current contest and other recently-opened contests.

If you have not unchecked "Hide extensions for known file types" in Windows Explorer Options, you will not see N1MM Logger.ini. You will see "N1MM Logger" with a Type of "Configuration Settings".

1. Configurer >Hardware tab

The Hardware tab is used to set up your radios, packet interfaces, telnet connections, CW/PTT/digital ports and the interfaces to other devices, such as SO2R controllers, multi-purpose interfaces, and keyers, if they require serial or parallel ports. Set the values appropriate to your station. If you do not have one of the items listed connected to a port, make sure the port selection is 'None' and the check boxes are not checked for that port.

1.1. Hardware setup options

The program supports up to 8 serial ports, each of which can be anywhere in the range COM1-COM99, and 3 parallel ports (LPT1 - LPT3).
Set up each port depending on what equipment is connected and enter the appropriate information.

Image

This example screen shot shows a case in which three COM ports are being used. COM6 is used for radio control of an Elecraft K3. COM2 is being used for a Winkeyer for CW keying. COM10 is connected to a TNC or terminal unit for RTTY. The radio has two receivers and the program is configured for SO2V (Single Operator, 2 VFOs) with two Entry windows, one for each VFO/receiver.

A more detailed explanation of each of the controls on this window follows.

  • Port - for each device that is to be connected via a COM port, the COM port number is selected in this column from a pull-down list:

Image

    • This list displays all of the COM ports the program was able to open. In this example, COM1, COM2, COM5 and COM10 were found by the program when the Configurer window was opened. These ports might include real serial ports, USB-to-serial adapters, and/or virtual serial ports created by software drivers (e.g. microHam Router, LP-Bridge, etc.)
    • COM6 also appears on the example list above, but with an asterisk beside it. The asterisk indicates that this port was previously configured at this position in the N1MM Logger.ini file, but when the Configurer was opened, the program was unable to open the port. This could be the result of a USB-to-serial adapter being unplugged, or as the result of other software that had previously created a virtual serial port but that was not running at the time the Configurer was opened
      • If this asterisked device is left configured for COM6, after exiting the Configurer the program will issue a warning that it was unable to open the port. The function that should be provided by this port will be unavailable. This can be corrected by connecting the USB adapter or creating the software virtual port in the other software, then reopening and closing the Configurer
      • If a different COM port is selected from the list, the missing COM port denoted by the asterisk will disappear from the pull-down list

  • Radio - The pull-down list in the box in this column can be used to select a radio that is to be interfaced with the program using this port for radio control, i.e. control of the radio's frequency and mode. A maximum of two radios can be connected. Select 'None' if this port is not being used for radio control. If you have only one radio connected, only one of the boxes in this column should be configured to anything other than "None"
  • Digital - Checking this box means this port is used for digital communication (MMTTY/MMVARI/Fldigi engine or TNC). This box cannot be checked if this port is used for radio control. Conversely, if this box is checked the pull-down list in the Radio column is disabled. Not all ports used for digital communication are configured here; check this box only if one of the following conditions is met:
    • Use this to indicate a port that is used for a TU or TNC for RTTY
    • Use it to indicate a port that is used for PTT from MMVARI in digital modes. This is not necessary with the external digital engines (MMTTY, 2Tone and Fldigi), only with MMVARI
    • Use it to indicate a port that will be time-shared between digital and non-digital modes. This could be, for example, a port that is used for serial port CW keying when the operating mode is CW, and for FSK and/or PTT keying when the operating mode is RTTY. The CW/Other box will also be checked for such a time-shared port
      • If the only time the port is used is in digital modes from MMTTY, 2Tone or Fldigi, it is not necessary to check this check box; simply configure the port directly within the digital engine without setting it up in the Configurer
      • If you control PTT from the radio control port or from a Winkeyer, do not check the Digital box for that port
      • If you are using a port for FSK keying with MMTTY or MMVARI via the EXTFSK or EXTFSK64 add-in, the port cannot be time-shared, and therefore you would not check the Digital box for this port
  • CW/Other - Check this box if this port is used for CW, PTT, a foot-switch, a DVK or an SO2R controller. This selection may be made in combination with a Radio or Digital selection provided the uses are compatible (e.g. Winkeyer and radio control cannot use the same serial port, because both use serial communications, whereas keying CW on the DTR control line can be compatible with radio control on the same port if your hardware interface supports it). In addition to the serial ports, the CW/Other box can also be selected for one or more parallel ports (LPT1/2/3) to be used for CW or PTT keying or for other types of device control.

Close
informationConfiguring a Port for a Winkeyer
To configure a port for a Winkeyer, first select a port, in the left-most column of the Hardware tab. Then check the CW/Other box in that same row. finally, click the Set button and check the Winkeyer box in the dialog that appears
warningUse ONLY ONE method of PTT or CW keying
Note that having multiple ports configured for CW or PTT can cause problems; for example, having two methods of PTT control operating at the same time can result in the radio failing to switch to transmit, or worse, locking up in transmit at the end of a function key message. Pick one method of CW keying and one method of PTT control, check the CW/Other box for the port or ports you need for them and complete the port configuration using the Set button, and make sure CW/Other is not checked for ports that you are not currently using. For digital modes, do not configure PTT control from the digital engine (MMTTY or Fldigi) if you have PTT control operating from the main N1MM Logger program.
  • Details - Click on the Set button in this column to open a window with a set of controls that depends on what is selected in the preceding columns (Radio, Digital, Packet, CW/Other). To the right of the details column is a summary of the detailed settings. See below for details.

The radio buttons in the upper right corner are used to fit the program to your desired mode of operation.

  • SO1V - Single Operator 1 VFO
    • In SO1V mode, the backslash, Pause, Ctrl+Right-arrow, grave accent(`) and Ctrl+Alt+K keys are disabled to prevent opening the second Entry window. If the second Entry window and/or Bandmap window were open when the Configurer was opened, they will be closed when exiting the Configurer after selecting SO1V
  • SO2V - Single Operator 2 VFO (one radio, using both VFOs)
    • Permits using two separate Entry windows, one for each VFO; the full SO2V functionality is usable only with radios that have dual receivers
  • SO2R - Single Operator 2 Radios
    • Permits using two separate Entry windows, one for each radio

1.2. Set button examples

Some examples of the dialog box that appears when you click on the Set button are given here.

For a port selected for radio control:
Image

  • Speed - The speed of the serial port (check the manual of your radio)
  • Parity - The parity used (check the manual of your radio)
  • Data Bits - The number of data bits used (check the manual of your radio)
  • Stop Bits - The number of stop bits used (check the manual of your radio)
  • DTR - The following selections can be made for DTR (pin 4 on DB9 connector):
    • PTT - used for keying the radio
    • CW - used for sending CW to the radio
      • Note: The PTT and CW selections require either a keying circuit between DTR and the radio's PTT input or CW key jack, or a transceiver that can accept direct switching on the DTR line on its radio control port (such as an Elecraft K3). The CW/Other check box in the main Configurer window must be checked to enable PTT or CW switching via DTR
    • Always on - DTR is always 'high'
    • Always off - DTR is always 'low'
    • Handshake - DTR is used for handshaking
  • RTS - The same selections as for DTR can be made for RTS (pin 7 on DB9 connector):
    • PTT - used for keying the radio
    • CW - used for sending CW to the radio
      • Note: The PTT and CW selections require either a keying circuit between RTS and the radio's PTT input or CW key jack, or a transceiver that can accept direct switching on the RTS line on its radio control port (such as an Elecraft K3). The CW/Other check box in the main Configurer window must be checked to enable PTT or CW switching via RTS
    • Always on - RTS is always 'high'
    • Always off - RTS is always 'low'
    • Handshake - RTS is used for handshaking
      • When both RTS and DTR are set to PTT they will both be keyed for PTT with the set PTT delay
      • When using a self-powered interface for radio control, set DTR and/or RTS to Always On to supply power to the interface
  • Icom Addr (hex) - The hex address for the radio. Enter without the "H" i.e. 26 not 26H. This field is only shown when an Icom is the selected radio
  • Radio Nr - The radio controlled from this port:
    • In SO1V (one radio, one VFO used) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2V (one radio, two VFOs) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2R select the radio (1 or 2) that will be controlled from this port
  • PTT Delay (msec) - This box only appears if DTR or RTS is set to PTT. It is used to configure a delay between the time the PTT signal is switched and CW sending starts, in order to prevent hot-switching
  • Enable Both Hardware & Software - This check box allows both hardware and software PTT control methods to be used. USE WITH CAUTION. With some radios, using software and hardware PTT control at the same time can lead to problems such as the radio hanging up in transmit at the end of CW or RTTY messages
  • Allow ext. interrupts - Allow external interrupts from this port (DSR - pin 6), e.g. from a footswitch. An interrupt on this line will bring focus to the Entry window and stop a CQ in progress. See FootSwitch settings below
  • PTT via Radio Command Digital Mode - If this check box is checked, a software radio command will be used to control PTT in digital modes
  • PTT via Radio Command SSB Mode - If this check box is checked, a software radio command will be used to control PTT in SSB modes
  • PTT via Radio Command CW Mode - If this check box is checked, a software radio command will be used to control PTT in CW mode
    • By using these check boxes selectively, you can choose to control PTT in some modes and not others (e.g. controlling PTT in digital modes for FSK RTTY while using VOX for SSB and QSK for CW)
  • FootSwitch - Pin 6 on the serial port can be used for one of the following options (if the interface allows this line to be broken out from the radio control lines and external interrupts are enabled on this port):
    • None - No footswitch
    • ESM Enter - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing Enter key in ESM mode
    • Typing Focus - Pressing Footswitch will switch typing focus
    • Switch Radios - Pressing Footswitch will switch the radios (in SO2R)
    • Normal - Pressing the footswitch it will behave if it was connected to the PTT of the active transmitter and is automatically connected to the proper (active) radio.When the footswitch is released the focus will be set to main Entry window
    • F1 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F1
    • F2 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F2
    • F3 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F3
    • F4 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F4
    • F11 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F11
    • F12 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F12
    • Band lockout - Implemented mostly for multi user stations to block a second signal on the same band/mode. It may be useful for single users as well. This mode should allow you to control PTT for both radios (in case of SO2R) in different modes (SSB/CW). The advantage of using it (compared to a foot switch directly connected to the radio) is that it stops AutoCQ and Dueling CQ's
      • It is possible to connect a separate footswitch to each serial or parallel port. A pull-up resistor is needed between DSR input (pin 6) and +12 VDC. Multiple footswitches (one per port) can be used with different settings for each one.
  • Help - used to display Help for the Configurer from the on-line manual
  • OK - save the settings and exit this dialog window
  • Cancel - exit this window without saving the settings


For a port whose CW/Other check box is checked:
Image

  • DTR - The following selections can be made for DTR (pin 4 on DB9 connector):
    • PTT - used for keying the radio
    • CW - used for sending CW to the radio
      • Note: The PTT and CW selections require a keying circuit between DTR and the radio's PTT input or CW key jack
    • Always on - DTR is always 'high'
    • Always off - DTR is always 'low'
    • Handshake - DTR is used for handshaking
  • RTS - The same selections as for DTR can be made for RTS (pin 7 on DB9 connector):
    • PTT - used for keying the radio
    • CW - used for sending CW to the radio
      • Note: The PTT and CW selections require a keying circuit between RTS and the radio's PTT input or CW key jack
    • Always on - RTS is always 'high'
    • Always off - RTS is always 'low'
    • Handshake - RTS is used for handshaking
  • Radio Nr - The radio that this port is used with:
    • In SO1V (one radio, one VFO used) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2V (one radio, two VFOs) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2R select the radio (1 or 2) that this port is used with
  • PTT Delay (msec) - This box is used to configure a delay between the time the PTT signal is switched and CW sending starts, in order to prevent hot-switching an amplifier, for example
  • Allow ext. interrupts - Allow external interrupts from this port (DSR - pin 6), e.g. from a footswitch. An interrupt on this line will bring focus to the Entry window and stop a CQ in progress
  • Winkey - Select when using a Winkeyer. Speed, Parity, Data bits, Stop bits or Handshake settings do not have to be adjusted; they are fixed and set by the program. Settings for the keyer are made on the Winkeyer tab in the Configurer. If you select Winkeyer, DO NOT set DTR to CW.
    • Note: Only one Winkeyer is supported, but a single Winkeyer can key two radios
  • Two Radio Protocol - Support for an SO2R controller using a COM port. This provides USB-only SO2R control (no LPT port required). Protocol used may be either the microHam proprietary protocol (MK2R) or OTRSP (Open Two Radio Switching Protocol)
  • FootSwitch - Pin 6 on the serial port can be used for one of the following options (if external interrupts are enabled on this port):
    • None - No footswitch
    • ESM Enter - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing Enter key in ESM mode
    • Typing Focus - Pressing Footswitch will switch typing focus
    • Switch Radios - Pressing Footswitch will switch the radios (in SO2R)
    • Normal - Pressing the footswitch it will behave if it was connected to the PTT of the active transmitter and is automatically connected to the proper (active) radio.When the footswitch is released the focus will be set to main Entry window
    • F1 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F1
    • F2 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F2
    • F3 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F3
    • F4 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F4
    • F11 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F11
    • F12 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F12
    • Band lockout - Implemented mostly for multi user stations to block a second signal on the same band/mode. It may be useful for single users as well. This mode should allow you to control PTT for both radios (in case of SO2R) in different modes (SSB/CW). The advantage of using it (compared to a foot switch directly connected to the radio) is that it stops AutoCQ and Dueling CQ's
      • It is possible to connect a separate footswitch to each serial or parallel port. A pull-up resistor is needed between DSR input (pin 6) and +12 VDC. Multiple footswitches (one per port) can be used with different settings for each one.
  • Help - used to display Help for the Configurer from the on-line manual
  • OK - save the settings and exit this dialog window
  • Cancel - exit this window without saving the settings


For a COM port for which the Digital check box has been checked, either in order to use a TNC or to time-share the port:
Image

  • DTR - The following selections can be made for DTR (pin 4 on DB9 connector); if the port is time-shared, these selections will only apply in non-digital modes:
    • PTT - used for keying the radio
    • CW - used for sending CW to the radio
      • Note: The PTT and CW selections require a keying circuit between DTR and the radio's PTT input or CW key jack. The CW/Other check box in the main Configurer window must be checked to enable PTT or CW switching via DTR
    • Always on - DTR is always 'high'
    • Always off - DTR is always 'low'
    • Handshake - DTR is used for handshaking
  • RTS - The same selections as for DTR can be made for RTS (pin 7 on DB9 connector); if the port is time-shared, these selections will only apply in non-digital modes
    • PTT - used for keying the radio
    • CW - used for sending CW to the radio
      • Note: The PTT and CW selections require a keying circuit between RTS and the radio's PTT input or CW key jack. The CW/Other check box in the main Configurer window must be checked to enable PTT or CW switching via RTS
    • Always on - RTS is always 'high'
    • Always off - RTS is always 'low'
    • Handshake - RTS is used for handshaking
  • Radio Nr - The radio this port is used with:
    • In SO1V (one radio, one VFO used) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2V (one radio, two VFOs) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2R select the radio (1 or 2) that this port is used with
  • Dig Wnd Nr - This MUST be set to indicate which Digital Interface window uses this port. If it is set to 0, the port will not be used in digital modes
    • If only one DI window is used (e.g. SO1V), select 1
    • If two DI windows are used, select the DI window number this port will be used for
  • Allow ext. interrupts - Allow external interrupts from this port (DSR - pin 6), e.g. from a footswitch. An interrupt on this line will bring focus to the Entry window and stop a CQ in progress; non-digital modes only
  • FootSwitch - Pin 6 on the serial port can be used for one of the following options (if the interface allows this line to be broken out and external interrupts are enabled on this port):
    • None - No footswitch
    • ESM Enter - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing Enter key in ESM mode
    • Typing Focus - Pressing Footswitch will switch typing focus
    • Switch Radios - Pressing Footswitch will switch the radios (in SO2R)
    • Normal - Pressing the footswitch it will behave if it was connected to the PTT of the active transmitter and is automatically connected to the proper (active) radio.When the footswitch is released the focus will be set to main Entry window
    • F1 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F1
    • F2 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F2
    • F3 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F3
    • F4 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F4
    • F11 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F11
    • F12 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F12
    • Band lockout - Implemented mostly for multi user stations to block a second signal on the same band/mode. It may be useful for single users as well. This mode should allow you to control PTT for both radios (in case of SO2R) in different modes (SSB/CW). The advantage of using it (compared to a footswitch directly connected to the radio) is that it stops AutoCQ and Dueling CQ's
      • It is possible to connect a separate footswitch to each serial or parallel port. A pull-up resistor is needed between DSR input (pin 6) and +12 VDC. Multiple footswitches (one per port) can be used with different settings for each one.
  • Help - used to display Help for the Configurer from the on-line manual
  • OK - save the settings and exit this dialog window
  • Cancel - exit this window without saving the settings


For an LPT port:
Image

  • Pin 17 - always used for CW keying; greyed out because it cannot be changed
  • Pin 16 - used for PTT, except when an external DVK is used; greyed out because it cannot be changed
  • Radio Nr - The radio that this port is used with:
    • In SO1V (one radio, one VFO used) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2V (one radio, two VFOs) Radio Nr = 1
    • In SO2R select the radio (1 or 2) that this port is used with
      • If using an LPT SO2R box, set the Radio Nr for the first LPT port to Both. Pin 14 will be used to select the radio for CW, PTT, etc.
      • If using band data lines with this setup, band data for the first radio is routed to the first LPT port (Radio Nr = Both) and band data for the second radio is routed to the second LPT port (Radio Nr = 2)

noteLPT Port Numbers
With N1MM, SO2R and LPT CW, the LOWEST numbered port must have the CW output set to BOTH if it is used with a conventional LPT SO2R box (DXD, KK1L, N6BV, etc.) or microHAM MK2R/MK2R+ in LPT (Classic auto control) mode, The LPT with CW, PTT and the TX/RX/Split controls must be connected to the SO2R controller. If N1MM is configured for CW on TWO LPT ports (first port: Radio=1, second port Radio=2) then CW will be present only on the port representing the radio with transmit focus.

  • PTT Delay (msec) - This box is used to configure a delay between the time the PTT signal is switched and CW sending starts, in order to prevent hot-switching an amplifier, for example
  • Allow ext. interrupts - Allow external interrupts from pin 15, e.g. from a footswitch. An interrupt on this line will bring focus to the Entry window and stop a CQ in progress
  • DVK - DVK interface for MK2R, W9XT & other external DVKs. See this page for detailed information, pinouts, and limitations
    • When DVK is selected, Antenna selection via the LPT port is disabled (the DVK pins and the antenna pins on the LPT port overlap)
    • When using an external DVK, all of the Run and S&P SSB function keys should be set to empty.wav and not left blank
    • microHAM MK2R: if DVK is checked, N1MM Logger will use the DVK in Router instead of its own DVK support
  • FootSwitch - Pin 15 on the parallel port can be used for one of the following options:
    • None - No footswitch
    • ESM Enter - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing Enter key in ESM mode
    • Typing Focus - Pressing Footswitch will switch typing focus
    • Switch Radios - Pressing Footswitch will switch the radios (in SO2R)
    • Normal - Pressing the footswitch it will behave if it was connected to the PTT of the active transmitter and is automatically connected to the proper (active) radio.When the footswitch is released the focus will be set to main Entry window
    • F1 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F1
    • F2 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F2
    • F3 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F3
    • F4 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F4
    • F11 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F11
    • F12 - Pressing Footswitch will cause the same action as pressing function key F12
    • Band lockout - Implemented mostly for multi user stations to block a second signal on the same band/mode. It may be useful for single users as well. This mode should allow you to control PTT for both radios (in case of SO2R) in different modes (SSB/CW). The advantage of using it (compared to a footswitch directly connected to the radio) is that it stops AutoCQ and Dueling CQ's
      • It is possible to connect a separate footswitch to each serial or parallel port. A pull-up resistor is needed between DSR input (pin 6) and +12 VDC. Multiple footswitches (one per port) can be used with different settings for each one.
  • CW/PTT Port Addr - specify port address (Required!)
    • The initial default address in this box, if there is one, may not be correct in some computers or for some add-in cards; if the port does not work, check the port's properties in Device Manager to determine the correct address. There is more information on this topic in the Interfacing chapter
  • Help - used to display Help for the Configurer from the on-line manual
  • OK - save the settings and exit this dialog window
  • Cancel - exit this window without saving the settings


Additional signals are also present on the parallel port. See Radio Interfacing for more detailed info.

1.3. PTT Options

Originally, Push-to-Talk (PTT) was actually a copyrighted term, describing how operators of one company's radios could press a button on their microphones to switch from Receive to Transmit. Over the years, however, it has come to denote any form of transmit/receive switching external to the radio. It could be as simple as a microphone button or a footswitch working directly with the radio, or as sophisticated as control by a logging program.

N1MM Logger+ provides several options:

  • PTT via serial or parallel port - This option uses the RTS or DTR lines on a serial port or pin 16 on an LPT port. This more-or-less standard method usually requires a simple one-transistor interface to switch the radio. USB-to-serial adapters can be used for this function; ordinary USB-to parallel (printer) adapters will not work, because they lack the ability to control individual lines in the parallel interface - the one exception is the SO2RXLAT interface developed by PIEXX.
  • PTT via Winkeyer - If a Winkeyer, a keyer that emulates the Winkeyer, or an interface incorporating a Winkeyer chip is used, its PTT output can be used in all modes to control transmit/receive switching.
  • PTT via radio command - For radios that support it, this option eliminates any need for external hardware other than a serial port cable or a serial to USB converter. Check your radio manual for details.

Warning: At the moment, there is no provision for both controlling radio PTT via radio command and simultaneously introducing a delay before the Logger begins to send a stored message, so if you need to protect external equipment (see below) you should not use this option.

1.3.1. PTT delay

This is an important aspect of PTT operation. Some amplifiers are slower than many radios, so if the radio begins to transmit as soon as PTT is asserted, it may result in hot-switching of the amplifier's internal transmit/receive relays, which can result in damage. In addition, for VHF operation, preamplifiers located at the antenna may need to be properly sequenced to avoid damage from transmitted RF.

  • In the case of PTT via serial or parallel port, this delay is set in the Configurer, on the Hardware tab, when configuring a port for PTT. Note that for a serial port, you will only see this option if you have first selected PTT on either RTS or DTR.
  • For Winkeyer PTT, set this delay (called lead-time in Winkeyer parlance) on the Winkeyer tab of the Configurer. This affects both hand-sent CW and stored messages. You will probably find that any value over 20 milliseconds (probably enough for most amps) throws off your hand-sent keying.

1.4. Other Information

Under 32 and 64 bit bit Windows operating systems, using the parallel and serial ports for PTT and CW keying requires a special dll called inpout32.dll. This dll is installed with the Logger, but if the file is not installed for some reason, information on finding and installing it can be found in the Installation chapter.

2. Configurer >Function Keys Tab

Image

Function key operation is controlled from this tab.

2.1. Function Keys Field Descriptions

  • Send leading zeros in serial numbers - Send leading zeros to make into 3 digit number. In CW: Select leading T with the Cut Number Style selector. RTTY: In RTTY zeros will be added, so 1 will become 001
  • Send cut numbers - In CW this causes serial numbers, and RSTs if you are using the {SENTRSTCUT} macro, to be sent using the Cut Number Style set at the bottom of the dialog. Ctrl+G can be used to toggle this option while operating. The new status after toggling will be shown in the status line at the bottom of the entry window. Numbers other than serial numbers and {SENTRSTCUT} will not be affected by this option. This option does not apply to SSB or digital modes
  • Send corrected call before end of QSO - If the callsign is corrected after answering a call, then the corrected call will be sent before the End of QSO message (as configured by the End of QSO Key). E.g. 'PA1M TU DE N1MM' instead of 'TU DE N1MM'
  • Send partial calls - CW only. When sending a partial corrected call only the corrected part will be send (prefix or suffix). If not checked the whole call will be sent
  • Use CW contest word spacing - This setting changes the spacing between words in your CW, where "N1MM 599 5" is 3 words. Default is 6 bits for "contest spacing". When box is not checked, 7 bits between words is used, which is "normal spacing"
  • Stop sending CQ when callsign is changed - Typing a character in the callsign field will stop a (repeated) CQ
  • ESM sends your call once in S&P, then ready to copy received exchange - This is often called the "Big Gun / Little Pistol switch" . When selected and in Enter Sends Message mode the cursor moves to the Exchange field when there is something in the Callsign field and Enter is pressed (so it does not keep the cursor in the callsign field). If you don't usually get a station on the first call then deselect this option. Read more about Big Gun \ Little Pistol operation under ESM
  • Work dupes when running - This determines what is sent when a dupe calls you and you press Enter in ESM. Normally you DO want to work dupes, so this box would normally be checked. See the chapter Off topic for a discussion
  • String to use on cw between his call key and exchange key (default is one space) - Just as it says. Example ' ur '
  • Keycode of Ins Key Substitute - Enter the number for the Ins Key substitute as mapped below in this configurer dialog. Defaults to 186, the ; character. The program can automatically enter the keycode in this field . Place the cursor in the keycode field and press the key you want to substitute, it will put the correct keycode in. 186 is an extended key code. Not all keyboards map keys the same way. Note that you can't use a Shift, Ctrl, Alt etc. key. I would not advise using a key like Numeric + that is already in use. It may or may not work. In this case Numeric +, does NOT work
  • Keycode of TU/Log Key Substitute - Enter the number for the TU/Log Key substitute as mapped below in this configurer dialog. Defaults to 222, the ' character. The program can automatically enter the keycode in this field . Place the cursor in the keycode field and press the key you want to substitute, it will put the correct keycode in. 222 is an extended key code. Not all keyboards map keys the same way. Note that you can't use a Shift, Ctrl, Alt etc. key. I would not advise using a key like Numeric + that is already in use. It may or may not work. This particular case (Numeric +) does NOT work
  • Cut Number Style - the following cut number styles can be chosen:
    • T1234567890 (leading T) - leading 0 will be replaced with a T. So 007 will become TT7 and 030 will become T30
    • O1234567890 (leading O) - leading 0 will be replaced with an O. So 007 will become OO7 and 030 will become O30
    • T123456789T (all T) - all zeros will be replaced with a T. So 007 will become TT7 and 030 will become T3T
    • O123456789O (all O) - all zeros will be replaced with an O. So 007 will become OO7 and 030 will become O3O
    • T12345678NT (TN) - all zeros will be replaced with a T, all nines with an N. So 097 will become TN7 and 090 will become TNT
    • O12345678NO (ON) - all zeros will be replaced with an O, all nines with an N. So 097 will become ON7 and 090 will become ONO
    • TA2345678NT (TAN) - all zeros will be replaced with a T, all nines with an N, all ones with an A. So 091 will become TNA and 190 will become ANT
    • TA234E678NT (TAEN) - all zeros will be replaced with a T, all nines with an N, all ones with an A, all fives with an E. So 091 will become TNA and 1590 will become AENT
    • TAU34E67DNT - the zero, one, two, five, eight, nine will be replaced with a T, A, U, E, D, N respectively

2.2. Remapping Function Keys

Select which function keys to send messages. Each type of message has a combo box for you to set the appropriate function key. If the program is sending the wrong message check here first. The only restriction is that a key must mean the same thing in Running and in S&P. Function keys do not have to be unique for a selected message. There is little reason to do so although if you want it can be done. For the following messages a function key can be selected

  • CQ Key - defaults to F1
  • Exchange Key - defaults to F2
  • End of QSO Key - defaults to F3
  • His Call Key - defaults to F5
  • My Call Key - defaults to F4
  • QSO B4 Key - defaults to F6
  • Again Key - defaults to F8 (can be disabled)
  • Next Call Key - defaults to Disabled

ESM Mode Work dupes when running Mode QSO B4 Key Again Key Action Result action
On don't work dupes Run Disabled F-key DUPE callsign entered Send AGN message when Enter pressed
On don't work dupes Run Disabled Disabled DUPE callsign entered Send the EXCH when Enter is pressed, station will be worked and logged with Enter, Enter
On don't work dupes S&P Disabled F-key DUPE callsign entered Pressing Enter does nothing, no blue buttons in the Entry window
On don't work dupes S&P Disabled Disabled DUPE callsign entered Pressing Enter does nothing, no blue buttons in the Entry window
On work dupes Run - Disabled DUPE callsign entered. Mistake with received QSO data Send EXCH when Enter is pressed
On don't work dupes Run - Disabled Mistake with received QSO data Send EXCH when Enter is pressed
On - S&P - Disabled Mistake with received QSO data Send EXCH when Enter is pressed. After the user corrects the entry, it will log and not send anything


3. Configurer >Digital Modes Tab

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The Digital modes tab is used to set up the interfacing to external Controllers (TNCs), or to digital engines (MMTTY/MMVARI/Fldigi/2Tone) for sound card digital modes.

In SO1V mode, there is only one Digital Interface window, DI-1. In SO2V and SO2R modes, there are two Digital Interface windows, DI-1 and DI-2. Each DI window is associated with one of the two Entry windows. Each DI window is opened from the Window > Digital Interface menu item in the corresponding Entry window. The Digital Modes tab in the Configurer is used to configure both Digital Interface windows. The scrren shot above is for a two-radio setup in which the first radio is using a TNC (such as a PK-232) for RTTY, while the second radio is using MMTTY for AFSK RTTY.

3.1. Digital Modes Field Descriptions

  • Digital Interface 1 / 2
    • TU type
      • None
      • Soundcard - use this selection for MMTTY, 2Tone, MMVARI or Fldigi sound card software
      • Other - use this selection for a TNC or TU such as a PK-232 or KAM
      • Dxp38 - for the HAL DXP-38 TU
    • Port, Speed, Parity, Data Bits, Stop Bits, Flow Control - Used when Other or Dxp38 is selected, to set the parameters for the COM port used to communicate with the TNC or TU (e.g. 9600 baud, N, 8, 1, no flow control for the DXP-38)
  • DI-1 MMTTY Mode | DI-2 MMTTY mode
    • When using MMTTY, select whether AFSK or FSK is being used
    • The serial port MMTTY will use for PTT and FSK has to be set in the MMTTY Setup. More information in the MMTTY support chapter
  • DI-1 MMTTY Path | DI-2 MMTTY Path
    • The path to the MMTTY engine goes here including the file name of the program
    • The path and file name can be selected using the Select buttons
    • The two instances of MMTTY should be in two separate folders. You must do this if you want the MMTTY settings in the two instances to be different (e.g. left vs. right channel, different sound cards, etc.)
  • DI-1 Fldigi Path | DI-2 Fldigi Path
    • The path to the Fldigi engine goes here including the file name of the program
    • The path and file name can be selected using the Select buttons
  • DI-1 MMVARI RTTY Mode | DI-2 MMVARI RTTY Mode
    • When using MMVARI for RTTY, select whether AFSK or FSK is being used
    • If AFSK is selected the serial port (if any) with a check in the Digital check box and with Dig Wnd Nr corresponding to the DI window number will get passed to MMVARI when the DI window is opened, so that MMVARI can use it for PTT control
    • If FSK is selected, the port to be used for PTT control is not passed to MMVARI. It must be defined in the FSK8250, EXTFSK or EXTFSK64 setup window
  • DI-1 MMVARI FSKPort | DI-2 MMVARI FSKPort
    • Choose FSK8250 if you are using a true serial port or a device that can simulate a serial port and handle 5-bit codes at 45.45 baud (this does not include most consumer-grade USB-to-serial adapters, but it does include some commercial interfaces, such as interfaces specifically designed to support FSK RTTY)
      • When MMVARI is opened for FSK RTTY, a small window labelled FSK8250/16550 1.03 will open, or appear on the Windows Task bar. In this window you select the COM port number and the signal line to be used for PTT (RTS or DTR). FSK keying will be done on the TxD line. If this is a USB device that simulates a serial port, check Limiting speed. You can use the _ box at the top right to minimize this window after completing the setup
    • Choose EXTFSK if you are using a regular USB-to-serial adapter
      • When MMVARI is opened for FSK RTTY, a small window labelled EXTFSK 1.05a will open, or appear on the Windows Task bar. In this window you select the COM port number and the signal lines to be used for FSK keying (normally TxD) and PTT (RTS or DTR). You can use the _ box at the top right to minimize this window after completing the setup
    • On high-performance multi-core systems only, you may choose EXTFSK64 instead of EXTFSK. EXTFSK64 uses a more accurate timing mechanism than EXTFSK, but this mechanism uses significant CPU resources. EXTFSK64 is not appropriate for use on XP based systems or hardware running older dual-core Intel/AMD CPUs or Atom based CPUs. On systems that are capable of supporting it, EXTFSK64 can key FSK at speeds other than 45.45 baud, and it can also key FSK from LPT ports as well as USB-to-serial adapters. See http://www.qsl.net/ja7ude/extfsk/indexe.html for more detailed information on EXTFSK64
      • When MMVARI is opened for FSK RTTY, a small window labelled EXTFSK64 will open, or appear on the Windows Task bar. In this window you select the COM or LPT port number and the signal lines to be used for FSK keying (normally TxD) and PTT (RTS or DTR). You can use the _ box at the top right to minimize this window after completing the setup

4. Configurer >Other Tab

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The Other tab is used to set up default values and select special modes and functions.

4.1. Other Tab Field descriptions

  • DVK Letters File Path - This is where you specify the sub-path (relative to the Wav\LettersFiles subdirectory in the N1MM Logger+ User Files area) where the program will look for individual letter and number files for voicing of call signs and serial numbers in SSB. You can use {OPERATOR}\ in this file path, in which case each operator (specified using OPON or Ctrl+O) will have their own separate letters file subdirectory within the wav\LettersFiles directory

  • Primary CW Speed Step - The primary speed step is used with PgUp/PgDn keys or the speed adjust buttons in the Entry Window
  • Secondary CW Speed - The secondary speed step is used when Shift+PgUp/PgDn is pressed. Alt+PgUp/PgDn adjusts the CW speed of the inactive radio/VFO in SO2R/SO2V mode
  • Repeat time in millisecs - Specify the CQ repeat interval in the Entry window (Auto-CQ). The default value is 1.8 seconds. Enter a value in seconds or milliseconds. The maximum value is 32767. This is the same as Ctrl+R or 'Config | Set CQ repeat time' in the Entry Window
  • Default # Spots in - The number of spots returned by the SH/DX command in the bandmap window. The default value is 30 spots. The number of returned spots for the SH/DX command in the Telnet window is not affected by this value and has to be changed in the Telnet Options window

  • SSB Tuning Tolerance (Hz) - SSB mode: Clicking on or next to a station in the bandmap window will put the call on the callsign frame (if the callsign field is empty) of the Entry window. This value gives the maximum frequency distance to the call on the bandmap when it will be put on the callsign frame. The value has to be between 0 and 20000 (20 kHz). The default value is 300
  • CW Tuning Tolerance (Hz) - CW mode: Clicking on or next to a station in the bandmap window will put the call in the callsign frame (if the callsign field is empty) of the Entry window. This value gives the maximum frequency distance to the call on the bandmap when it will be put on the callsign frame. The value has to be between 0 and 20000 (20 kHz). The default value is 300
  • RTTY Tuning Tolerance - RTTY mode: Clicking on or next to a station in the bandmap window will put the call on the callsign frame (if the callsign field is empty) of the Entry window. This value gives the maximum frequency distance (in Hz) to the call on the bandmap when it will be put on the callsign frame. The value has to be between 0 and 20000 (20 kHz). The default value is 300
  • CW Weight - Adjusts the CW weight (between 30-70% limits). The default value is 50. This weight command works not only for serial or LPT port CW but also for Winkeyer

  • SSB Up/Down Arrow Incr - This value gives the frequency jump amount (in kHz) of the up/down arrow keys in SSB
    • NB. Never make this smaller than the smallest step your radio can make in SSB. Older Icom rigs are known to have a smallest step of 100 Hz which is quite big. When the step is made smaller than the minimum step size the Up/Down Arrows don't seem to work. Also controls the amount of each frequency change when tuning the RIT on radios that support doing so from the computer
  • CW Up/Down Arrow Incr - This value gives the frequency jump amount of the up/down arrow keys in CW and digital modes
    • NB. Never make this smaller than the smallest step your radio can make in CW. Most rigs have a smallest step in the order of 10 Hz. When the step is made smaller than the minimum step size the Up/Down Arrows don't seem to work. Also controls the amount of each frequency change when tuning the RIT on radios that support doing so from the computer
  • PgUp/PgDn Incr (kHz) - This value gives the frequency jump amount for the {PGUP} {PGDN} macros (Note: the PgUp and PgDn keys are not used for this; the {PGUP} and {PGDN} macros must be used in function key macros. These macro names are holdovers from early versions of N1MM Logger Classic)

  • Clear automatically populated exchange on callsign change - When selected, if the callsign in the Entry window is changed by the operator, this option clears the contents of exchange fields in the Entry window that were populated (filled in) from a Call History file, from previous QSOs in the contest, or from a Telnet spot. Does not affect exchange data that have been manually filled in
  • Auto-Completion Mode - Auto-completion of callsigns. It works like Internet Explorer's address bar. If you type in a partial callsign, the program will attempt to match it with a call that you have already logged or is uniquely identified in the check window. If it matches, the rest of the call will be added to the callsign textbox and highlighted. You can then either accept the call as displayed, or keep typing. If you keep typing, the highlighted portion will be replaced by what you type
  • Start Contest Reporting Application - Start the contest reporting application. With this application you can show your contest efforts in real time during a contest to the world. Next to this application a website is needed where everyone can see the score. This application automatically uploads scores from the current selected contest to the configured website
  • Exclude band breakdown - When this option is checked, only the total number of QSOs and the total score are reported. If the option is not checked, band breakdown data is also sent to the contest reporting application

  • Mute mic on supported radios - Mute the microphone during transmit. Normally used to enter audio via a radio input other than the microphone. Default is to not mute
    • Tentec Orion: If "Mute" is checked, it causes the Orion's mic input to be muted and the Aux input to un-mute during voice keyer events
    • Supported radios are: Tentec Orion and Elecraft K3
  • Use Reverse CW Radio 1 - When selecting CW send a command to the radio to use Reverse CW

5. Configurer >Winkey Tab

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The Winkeyer tab is used to control functions of the K1EL Winkeyer keyer chip. Winkeyer is designed by K1EL and G3WGV. To connect It is only active when the Winkeyer box has been checked on a serial port, and that port (whether real or virtual), has been connected either to a stand-alone keyer or to a device that embeds the Winkeyer chip, such as various MicroHAM and RigExpert products. Consult your unit's manual along with the Winkeyer chip manual for more information on these settings.

To set up a port for a Winkeyer (or for a device that embeds a Winkeyer chip), consult this section.

Winkeyer is fed ASCII characters from N1MM Logger (via COM or USB Ports), and converts the ASCII to timed CW. The pot speed range is from a minimum of 10 wpm to a maximum of 55 wpm. Winkeyer can also be used to control PTT. Winkeyer PTT can be used on modes other than CW. Note: This only works for Winkeyer versions 10, and 21 and greater.

5.1. Winkeyer Field Descriptions

  • Keying Mode - Select the keying mode. Choices are: Iambic A, Iambic B, Ultimatic and Semi-Automatic. The default is Iambic B
  • Autospace - Select when the autospace feature should be used. When using the paddles to send, if a pause of longer than one 'dit' time is detected, THREE dit times of pause will be inserted before the next character. See the manual for more information
  • Pot is wired with two leads - Select when the potentiometer on the board is wired only with two instead of three wires. Under normal operation, leave unchecked. Unless you've built the keyer yourself, or your keyer vendor recommends this, leave unchecked
  • Pin 5 Function - Select the function of pin 5. Unless your keyer's manual tells you otherwise, the default of PTT is likely what you want here. The Winkeyer manual is also a good reference. The choices are:
    • PTT (default)
    • Sidetone
    • 2nd CW (second output, do not use for SO2R - see below))
    • None
  • Sidetone Frequency - Select the Winkeyer's sidetone frequency. The default sidetone frequency is 469 Hz
  • Reverse Paddles - Reverse the left and right paddle
  • Ignore Winkeyer Speed Pot - Ignore the setting of the Winkeyer potentiometer
  • Lead Time - Set the lead time value in 10ms Increments (up to 2.55 seconds). This value reflects the amount of time that the Winkeyer PTT will be asserted BEFORE keying commences
    • If when sending CW you are missing the first dot or dash, or if paddle-sent CW doesn't seem responsive (again, missing the first character) set this to at least 10 mSec
    • NOTE that this field denotes 10 mSec intervals — '1' in this box means 10 mSec
    • If Pin 5 function is set to PTT, set this value to at least 1 (10 mSec)
  • Tail Time - Sets the tail time in 10 mSec Increments (up to 2.55 SECONDS). This value reflects the amount of time that the Winkeyer PTT line will be held after keying stops. Tail Time = 1 results in a tail time of one dit time (v2.2; 10 msec in earlier versions of Winkeyer), Tail Time = 2 adds 10 msec to that, Tail Time = 3 adds another 10 msec, and so on. If Tail Time is set to zero, then Hang Time is used instead
  • First Character Extension - Sets the extension time in 10 mSec steps (up to 2.55 seconds). Normally ONLY used with older, slower-keying rigs at speeds above 25 wpm, this setting will add time to the first element sent to help with the lack of T/R speed of those rigs. This value is usually set by experimentation. See the Winkeyer manual for more information on setting this value
  • Keying Compensation - Normally only used with high speed (>30 wpm) QSK operation. Adds time (in 1 mSec increments) to both dashes and dots to adjust for rig switching delays (however slight). See the Winkeyer manual for more information
  • Hang Time - Provides a CW speed-dependent means of holding PTT during CW sending. Hang Time can be used to set a CW-speed dependent delay of 1, 1.33, 1.67 or 2 letterspaces (not dit spaces) after the last paddle closure. Hang Time is only activated when Tail Time is set to zero.

  • Winkeyer 2
    • Sidetone - Gives a sidetone when sending CW (both when using a paddle and from computer input)
    • Paddle only sidetone - Gives a sidetone only when sending by paddle
    • Use 2nd output - If this option is checked, when the transmit focus is in the second radio Entry window, CW and PTT will be switched to Winkeyer Output 2. This is convenient for minimal CW SO2R, because no additional hardware is needed to switch CW and PTT between radios. You'll still need to do something about the received audio switching, though. Select this option only for SO2R operation.

noteSetting CW Speed and Weight in Winkeyer
Speed setting is done just as with other keying methods. The PgUp and PgDn keys will increase or decrease the speed (default is 2 WPM steps). You can also overwrite the value in the speed window, or use its up/down arrows. Ctrl+PgUp/PgDn increases or decreases the speed by a larger amount (default is 4 WPM). Both values can be adjusted on the Configurer's Other tab.

If the option to ignore the speed pot has not been selected, setting the speed using the speed control pot changes BOTH the paddle speed and the N1MM sending speed. Setting the speed using the entry window changes both the paddle sending speed and N1MM sending speed but ONLY UNTIL the next time the speed pot is adjusted, i.e. the absolute position of the speed pot then overrides any changes made in the entry window.

CW weight for Winkeyer can be set on the Other tab, but is not usually changed from the 50% default.

6. Configurer >Mode Control Tab

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The mode control tab determines how the mode will be controlled on the connected radio, whether the program sets the mode when changing frequency or not, and what mode it changes it to. This dialog also gives you control over how contacts will be logged.

Mode logged vs. Radio mode
In an ideal world, the mode in the log, the radio's mode and the mode in the software would all be the same. For traditional voice and keyed CW modes (CW, USB, LSB, AM, FM) this actually holds true. With the obvious exception of radios that do not support all of these modes, there is a one-to-one correspondence between the names of the modes on the radios, in the software and in the log. If these were the only modes that existed, it would always be possible to change modes on the radio and have the software follow (or vice versa) without risk of confusion or error, and there would be no need for mode control configuration settings.

However, when digital modes are brought into the picture this one-to-one correspondence breaks down. Any SSB-capable radio can be used for digital modes using a sound card, even if the radio itself does not have any native digital modes. This results in a many-to-one relationship (many different modes in the log can map to a single mode on the radio). In the case of RTTY, some radios have a native RTTY mode using FSK keying, and when it exists, this mode is uniquely associated with RTTY and not with any other digital mode in the log. However, the reverse is not true; depending on the hardware configuration and the operator's choice, RTTY in the log may correspond with either RTTY or SSB on the radio. In the case of some radios, there may also be an additional mode or modes in the radio tailored either specifically for AFSK RTTY or for sound-card digital modes generally.

Because of this breakdown in the one-to-one correspondence, a radio-first priority system cannot be imposed in all situations - once digital modes are involved, setting the mode on the radio does not always uniquely identify the mode that should be logged. Instead, the primary rule is "software first". Setting the mode in the software always controls what the radio does. You can select the mode in the software simply by typing the name of the mode (CW, SSB, USB, LSB, AM, FM, RTTY, PSK) into the entry window in the callsign box and pressing the Enter key. Provided the mode you have chosen is supported by the contest (this is determined by the Mode category in the contest setup window), the software and the radio will switch to the mode you have commanded, and that is the mode that will be logged, When the MMVARI or Fldigi digital engine is used, the specific digital mode logged will depend on what mode has been selected within the digital engine. Since not all radios use the same radio mode for digital modes, there are settings in the right side of the mode control configuration window that determine which radio mode is used for each of RTTY and PSK.

Despite the lack of a complete one-to-one correspondence between the modes in the log and in the radio, there are many situations where some degree of automated mode switching is possible, based either on the radio's mode or on the frequency, and within the limits imposed by the current contest setup (i.e. what modes are supported within the current contest). The settings that control whether this kind of automation is used, and on what basis, are in the left side of the mode control window.

One of these options is to use the band map. You may be able to use this within a single mixed-mode contest where the modes are kept well-separated in frequency. Unfortunately, this doesn't work in all situations. During major CW contests, for example, CW may be used pretty much throughout the normal digital sub-band. On the other hand, during a major RTTY contest you may find RTTY being used on frequencies that would normally be considered to be CW frequencies. For this reason, using the band map to determine the mode is not a foolproof set-and-forget option. Depending on the modes supported by your radio and the nature of the particular contest(s) you are operating in, you may need to choose one of the other options.

There is a difference in mode control behavior between the situation where the DI window and digital engine window are open and the situation where they are closed. This is due to the way serial ports are used by the digital engines and by the Logger. The digital engines are separate processes from the rest of the Logger, and a single serial port cannot be shared between two processes. Since serial ports can be a scarce resource in a complex contest station, the Logger allows time-sharing of serial ports between digital (FSK & PTT) and non-digital (CW & PTT) uses. It does this by switching the ports between the processes depending on whether the DI window is open or not. When the DI window is opened, serial ports that have the Digital box checked in the Configurer are closed by the Logger so that they can be opened by the digital engine. When the DI window is closed, these ports are released so that the Logger can open them for use in other modes.

Thus, whether the DI window is open or closed can make a significant difference to the hardware configuration. Whenever a serial port is time-shared between the Logger and a digital engine, that port cannot be used for PTT or CW keying in non-digital modes while the DI window is open.

In order to support the wide range of possible hardware configurations in a hardware-independent fashion, mode control in the Logger depends on whether the DI window is open or not. When the DI window is closed, radio-first mode control works between non-digital modes, but switching the radio mode to (or through) a digital mode or tuning the radio's frequency into (or through) a digital band segment does not open the DI window and switch the software to digital mode. To switch into a digital mode, the DI window must be opened from the software. This can be done by using the Entry window to select RTTY or PSK mode in a contest that supports digital modes, or by using the Window > Digital Interface menu item.

Once the DI window is open, changing modes on the radio does not close the DI window and the software does not switch out of digital mode, which means that radio mode-driven mode control does not work when the DI window is open. Mode changes in this state must be performed from the software. If the software is commanded from the Entry window to use a non-digital mode, the DI engine is closed by the software in order to free up any time-shared ports for the Logger to use.

6.1. Mode Control Field Descriptions

  • Mode recorded in log - Set how to determine the mode that will be entered in the log
    • Use radio mode (default) - if the DI Window is not open, use the mode received from the radio. If the DI Window is open, the mode used depends only on the digital engine and not on the mode received from the radio, as follows:
      • In digital modes, the mode in the log will be RTTY if using the MMTTY or 2Tone engine or a TNC
      • When using the MMVARI or Fldigi engine, the mode will be as selected in the MMVARI or Fldigi window (digital modes only for Fldigi)
    • Follow band plan - use the mode the internal bandplan gives for this frequency
    • Use contest mode or bandplan - if the contest is a single mode, use that mode. If mixed, use the bandplan (as above)
    • Use contest or radio mode - if the contest is a single mode, use that mode. If mixed, use the mode from the radio (as above)
    • Always: - always log the mode selected here (CW, SSB, RTTY, PSK31, PSK63, PSK125) regardless of the mode from the radio
  • Mode sent to radio - Select how to determine the mode sent to the radio
    • This applies only for digital modes. See the note below for details

noteDigital Mode Selection
Every radio seems to have a different range of choices and names for digital modes. Some radios have no modes specialized for digital modes, some have only one digital mode for FSK RTTY (for sound-card digital modes, you use USB or LSB), some add to this a separate mode intended for sound-card digital modes like AFSK RTTY and PSK31, and some radios have three separate digital modes for FSK RTTY, AFSK RTTY, and other sound-card digital modes like PSK31. There may also be two versions of each of these, one "normal" and one "reverse" (opposite sideband). Every manufacturer uses different names for these specialized modes.

For simplicity, N1MM Logger has its own radio-independent terminology. The Logger uses RTTY for the radio mode normally used for FSK RTTY (which is usually but not always called FSK or RTTY on the radio). If the radio has a mode that is designated for AFSK RTTY, the Logger calls it AFSK. AFSK-R is the "reverse" of this AFSK mode, i.e. on the upper sideband instead of LSB. If there is a mode intended for sound card data modes that is different from the AFSK-R mode, it will be called PSK in the Logger. Not all radios have all of these modes, so not all choices will necessarily be available, depending on what radio(s) is/are configured.

The translation between the mode name used on the radio and the mode name used in N1MM Logger is described at Click here to see the table

For RTTY, if you are using FSK, you should normally select RTTY. If you are using AFSK, you should normally select AFSK or LSB/USB, depending on whether your radio offers a specialized AFSK mode or not.

For PSK, the choice would normally be one of: PSK (if available), AFSK-R (on some radios), or USB.

7. Configurer >Antennas Tab

in-edit

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The Antennas Tab defines how antennas can be selected by the program, if you have appropriate hardware, and also controls the rotor program. The example above illustrates the features of this tab.

The program uses a variety of antenna-related interfacing options, depending on your hardware and preferences. For example, antenna selection can be controlled by using a band decoder in conjunction with a real LPT port. USB-to-parallel adapters do not work in this or other parallel port interfacing functions, because they do not allow program control of individual pins on the port.

Antenna selection can also be controlled by one of two serial port protocols, the proprietary MicroHam protocol and the Open Two Radio Switching Protocol (OTRSP). Rotators can be controlled either by using the N1MM Rotor Program, or by various third-party software packages that make use of UDP broadcasts sent by N1MM Logger+

Close
noteTip
Unlike most software you don't map bands to bcd outputs 0-15 with N1MM Logger. You map antennas to bcd outputs 0-15. You can still map bands, but the antenna approach is much more powerful. It supports multiple antennas per band, stacks, and multiple bands per antenna. See the screen shot above.

7.1. Antennas Tab Field Descriptions

  • Code - The code which will be presented on the LPT port as binary coded decimal output, using pins 9, 8, 7 and 2
    • The codes themselves are pre-determined. Sixteen different codes are the most that can be represented by the state of 4 pins. In the example above, no antenna for Code O is defined - this is because in that case that code is used to select automatic operation from the front panel of the remote antenna switch.
    • Each code represents ONE ANTENNA,, and you can have many different combinations.
  • Antenna -Text to describe the antenna. This text will appear on the status bar of the Entry window when you change bands or switch antennas for a given band.
  • Bands - The bands on which this antenna will be selected
    • List bands in MHz e.g. 1.8, 3.5, 7, separated by commas if more than one is covered by the antenna, as in the illustration.
    • The first antenna in the table will be selected when changing to a band. Press Alt+F9 to toggle through all the antennas for the current band.
    • An antenna may be used on any number of bands
  • Rotor Description - enter the description as defined in setting up the rotor program. It must be exactly the same in both places, because these names make the connection between the two programs.
    • More than one rotor can be selected (separate using commas), for example to turn a stack where more than one rotor is involved.
  • Offset - This offset is added to the rotor position to determine the antenna position. This is useful for antennas that are mounted at 90 degrees for pattern interference reasons, or for antennas that have simply turned some in the wind over the winter. The offset can also be entered for the selected rotor in the rotor program
  • Bidirectional - Check this box if the antenna can be set bidirectional (0 = not bidirectional, 1 = bidirectional) (e.g. Steppir)
  • Start N1MM Rotor Program - Start the N1MM Rotor program automatically from the N1MM Logger+ main program. You will need to stop it manually
  • Display Rotors Used By This Station -
  • Display Rotors Responding From Network -

noteLPT Port Conflict
When DVK is selected on an LPT port, antenna selection on that port will not work because the DVK pins and the antenna pins overlap.

8. Configurer >Audio Tab

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warningBefore We Start
Any time you change the Default sound card in your Windows Control Panel while N1MM Logger+ is running, you must shut N1MM Logger+ down and re-start it. Otherwise, the program and the operating system may be on "different pages", and it can cause audio functions not to work or to work strangely. Moreover, any time that you change the Windows Default sound card, you will have to come back to this tab and reset your audio options. You can imagine how we found this out!

8.1. Introduction


Users of N1MM Logger Classic may recall when we deleted the QSO recording function from this tab in favor of a separate recorder, QSOrder by K3IT. QSO recording is configured there, and not in the Configurer. Currently, the Audio tab in the Configurer only controls settings that are used for playback of stored voice messages and for recording those messages. This includes on-the-fly re-recording, such as might be required in contests for split SSB operation on 40 meters, for example.

Note: If your computer is using Windows XP SP3, then this audio setup is the only one available to you. If you are using a later operating system, you have the option of using either this setup or a new Logger+ audio configuration dialog, which is found on the Config menu of the Entry window. If you check the option on the Config menu, you will note that the Audio tab on the Configurer will no longer be visible, and you will need to use the Audio configuration dialog which is on the Config emnu. Conversely, if you are using XP, the Config menu entries will disappear. Full details on Logger+ audio will be found in this section.

If you are setting up this tab for the first time, a good beginning is to familiarize yourself with your computer's sound card(s). At the same time, you can assure yourself that all of your computer's audio settings are correct for recording from your microphone and playing back to your radio's audio input (microphone or line). A step-by step procedure for doing so is in the Interfacing section of Getting Started. A much more detailed treatment of the use of stored messages in SSB contests is here.

8.2. Audio Output

  • 1 - Only use Radio 1 Output Device, Output on both channels
    • One radio and one sound card, to play stored messages, record or re-record messages and mute the microphone when playing stored messages.
    • Use this setting with two radios if you are using separate sound cards for the two radios.
  • 2 - Two Radio, Output left channel on left radio, right channel on right radio
    • Use this setting if you are using a single sound card to play stored message files to two separate radios in SO2R (one channel for each radio)

8.3. Tx Sound Card Setup


This is where it gets a little messy, largely because of differences in the way Windows XP handles sound cards, versus the way they are managed in Vista, 7 and 8. Let's look at that a bit.

In Windows XP,

  • Select Radio 1 Output Device - Select the sound card to use for sending stored messages (.wav files) on Radio 1.


In Windows Vista and later operating systems, the pull-down list shows output (playback) ports available on the computer, including those on multiple sound cards if more than one is available.

If there is a CODEC built in to Radio 1, choose that (CODEC is used here and elsewhere in this manual as a synonym for sound card). If not, choose the Line Out or Speaker Out port on the sound card that is connected to Radio 1's audio input.

In Windows XP, the pull-down list shows sound cards available on the computer; choose the built-in radio CODEC in Radio 1 or the sound card whose Line Out or Speaker Out port is connected to Radio 1's audio input.

  • Select Radio 2 Output Device - Same as for Radio 1.


8.3.1. CODEC

Built-in sound card capability is just starting to appear in new-generation transceivers.

  • Radio 1 Output Device is an Internal Radio Codec - Check this box if you are using a CODEC built into Radio 1 instead of a separate sound card
  • Radio 2 Output Device is an Internal Radio Codec - Check this box if you are using a CODEC built into Radio 2 instead of a separate sound card

8.3.2. Select Port to Mute


Typically, this is used to mute the microphone during stored message playback, so you would select Microphone from the drop-down list. The two options are for Radio 1 and 2, left to right

8.3.3. Select Message Recording Device

Select the sound card to use for recording stored messages for later playback on either radio. In Windows Vista and newer versions, the pull-down list displays playback ports available on the computer. Choose a port that is on the sound card that you will be using to record SSB messages. In Windows XP, select the sound card that will be used to record SSB messages.

You may ask what playback ports have to do with recording - we'll just have to ask you to trust us on this one. you must select a device in order for recording ports to appear (see below).

8.3.4. Select Message Recording Port

Having selected the sound card device, use this pull-down list to select the recording port you will use on the selected sound card device to record SSB messages. This is normally the microphone input

8.3.5. Recording Channels

Select 1 or 2, depending on whether you want a one or two-channel recording - for example in SO2R mode.
Recording Bits__ - 8 bits gives the most compact recordings, at the price of audio fidelity.

8.3.6. Recording Bits and Sample Rate

  • Recording Bits - this setting determines how your sound card digitizes analog audio levels - generally, the lower the bit rate the smaller the file but also the lower the fidelity
  • Recording Sample Rate - This setting determines how your sound card digitizes analog audio__ frequencies. Select the sample rate to record. The lower the rate the smaller the files but audio quality will be less.
  • Max Recording Length - Upper limit on the length of a recorded message, in seconds.
noteNot All Sound Cards are Created Equal
The Configurer lets you pick parameters that your sound card may not support. If you choose a parameter that is not supported by your card, you should see Error 4 in the status line of your Entry Window when you try to play back a message, but under some circumstances, this may not happen. Our best advice is to verify that sample rates match and test before the contest starts.

This can be tricky. Even though playback rate is not specified, some sound cards permit playback only of .wav files recorded at a given sample rate, such as 44.1 or 48 KHz. Make sure your recording parameters match those, or you will not hear any output from your recordings (don't ask how we know).

9. Configurer >Score Reporting Tab

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In N1MM Logger+, the Real-Time Score Reporting function has been integrated with the rest of the program. Instead of checking a box on the Other tab of the Configurer to start it, it now has its own tab in the Configurer.

Following, left to right, are the options you will need to set up to use it.

  • Report Real-Time Score to Server - this checkbox is checked to start reporting real-time scores. It will stay selected until you uncheck it.
  • Exclude band breakdown - if you feel that for competitive reasons you don't want to disclose your band breakdown, revealing your band-change strategy, leave this box unchecked.
  • Score Reporting Server - At this time, the only real-time score reporting server is cqcontest.net. If any when others become available, they will be added.
  • Score Reporting Username and Password - For security reasons, cqcontest.net requires that you register your callsign and password. Once you have done so, enter them in the textboxes provided.
  • Update Interval - Adjustable from 2 minutes to 60 minutes.


To be sure that your scores are being sent, check just above the lower text pane in the Info window. Each time a score is sent and acknowledged by the server, you'll see a notification there.


Last Modification: 09 December 2014 16:58:15 EST by n4zr.